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You’ll know a sound is harmful—and has done lasting damage—if your ears ring after you move away from its source.

More than half of people in their 50s have some degree of hearing loss. But the Stones and The Who may not be entirely to blame. In fact, some deficits are temporary and can easily be reversed. Here are three common causes of hearing loss in midlife adults—and how to turn the volume back up. For instance,  This new breakthrough may reverse hearing loss and tinnitus naturally…

Clogged Ears

About 12 million people (that’s 1 in 20 adults) visit the doctor each year to have earwax removed, according to a report from the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS). “We can hear with as little as 3 to 5% of the canal clear, so it may take years for enough wax to accumulate to stifle hearing,” says Peter Roland, MD, professor and chairman of the department of otolaryngology/head and neck surgery at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. “But if water gets in—while you shower, for example—it can cause wax to swell and create a blockage.” When that happens, patients often worry they’ve suddenly gone deaf. Fortunately (and to their relief), hearing is immediately restored after their ears are cleared.

Undiagnosed Allergy

Blocked sinuses caused by colds, sinus infections, and allergies can temporarily cause hearing loss when the eustachian tube—the channel responsible for regulating ear pressure—swells shut, sucking fluid into the ear space, says Roland. What appears to be a recurring cold may actually be an undiagnosed allergy that prevents your ears from clearing, leaving them chronically blocked. Identifying and treating the hearing loss condition will help you cut down on attacks and better manage the chronic congestion and buildup of fluid that cause muffled hearing.

NSAIDs

High doses of aspirin (more than 10 a day) or other NSAIDs such as ibuprofen (800 mg, three times a day) can cause tinnitus—a disruptive and irritating noise in the head without an external sound source, says Timothy C. Hain, MD, professor of neurology, otolaryngology, and physical therapy at Northwestern University.

But is there anything that can be done to reverse hearing loss naturally?
New research shows that there may in fact be a completely natural way to restore lost hearing. It was initially developed by the Amish. Click Here To Watch This Video to see exactly what you can do to start reversing your hearing loss and tinnitus.

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